• What Is HOH Prompting?

    Autism therapy experts who use Applied Behavior Analysis (ABA) have a number of tools and techniques that they can use to help children reach their full potential. One example is prompting. A prompt is a stimulus that encourages a desired response. Sometimes, hand over hand (HOH) prompting may be appropriate. As the name suggests, HOH prompting involves the practitioner placing his or her hand directly on the child’s hand to guide the child in completing a task. 

    HOH prompting is often used for teaching children how to acquire academic skills, such as manipulating a pair of scissors, and self-care skills, such as wielding a toothbrush. The goal of HOH prompting is eventually to fade it out. As the child develops a better grasp on the skill, the therapist will begin to make the hand prompting less obvious. For example, the child may eventually only need a gentle tap on the hand to remember how to complete the task properly. 

    At The Behavior Exchange, our autism therapists in Plano and Frisco, Texas only use evidence-based, proven ABA techniques, so you can feel confident in your child’s therapy plan. We welcome your call at (888) 716-8084.

  • Comparing Independent, Onlooker, and Parallel Play

    To the casual observer, one child’s method of play might look the same as any other. But behavior analysts and sociologists have identified multiple types of play. The type of play a child may engage in depends on his or her developmental level, age, mood, and social setting. Younger children often engage in independent play, also called solo play. Independent play is important for developing self-sufficiency. Children with autism tend to engage in independent play more than cooperative play with other children. 

    Onlooker play is similarly more common in younger children. It occurs when a child is acting as an observer as other children play. Onlooker play enables children to learn the rules of the game and pick up on the nuances of social interaction. Parallel play, which is common in three-year-olds, occurs when two children play beside each other, but not with each other. Although it might seem like children enjoying parallel play aren’t paying much attention to each other, they are indeed learning about important social cues. 

    Are you concerned that your child might not be engaging in age-appropriate play? Call The Behavior Exchange at (888) 716-8084 to request an appointment with a behavior analyst in Plano and Frisco, Texas.