• Spotlight on Our Social Skills Groups

    For children with autism, developing friendships and relating with peers is not always easy. At The Behavior Exchange, our Social Skills Groups can help. In our groups, school-aged children get the opportunity to work on creating and maintaining relationships with kids their own age. This group is designed for children with autism who are in school and doing fine academically but having difficulties in social situations.  

    Within our Social Skills Groups, we put children together based on their ages, skills, and needs. There are groups available for children who are just learning the basics about social skills and those who are advanced but need more confidence. Within their groups, they will have a chance to play games, practice conversation, and engage in other age-appropriate activities together, all under the guidance of ABA therapists.  

    Could the Social Skills Group at The Behavior Exchange be right for your child with autism in Plano? Find out more about all of our programs by calling (888) 716-8084.

  • Explaining Autism to a Younger Sibling

    If you have a child with autism, explaining the diagnosis to your other children is one part of working together as a family. When the sibling in question is younger than your child with autism, this process can be challenging, as you will decide what information is appropriate to share at what point in your younger child’s development. This information can help.  

    Before age seven, younger children may struggle with concrete information about autism and may do better with your simply answering questions and providing reassurance on an as-needed basis. As children get older, you can begin by explaining what autism is and how it impacts the affected child. Remind all siblings that it is your responsibility to be the parent, not theirs and that you are always available to answer questions.  

    Getting children involved in family therapy can be as important as getting your child with autism into a program at an autism treatment center. At The Behavior Exchange, we offer support for the whole family along with ABA therapists in Plano for kids with autism. To find out more about our services, call (888) 716-8084.

  • Autism in the Classroom: Questions to Ask Your Child’s Teacher

    Going to school is an exciting time for children and their parents. To ensure your child with autism has the support he or she needs in the classroom, keeping an open dialogue with the teacher is essential. At The Behavior Exchange, one of the roles that we play for the families that we support is being an advocate at your child’s school to ensure that he or she has access to the tools that he or she needs to be successful. As a parent, you are on the frontlines of your child’s day-to-day experience in the classroom, so it’s important to speak up and ask questions when you have them. To get the conversation started with your child’s teacher, consider asking these questions.  

    What is your experience with children with autism? 

    Often, teachers are aware of autism and even may have had students in the past who had been diagnosed with it, but they may not have the level of experience and understanding that they need to help your child in the classroom. The more your child’s teacher learns about autism and about your child’s needs, the more productive the school year will be for both of them. Find out what your child’s teacher knows and needs to learn more about, so you can provide helpful information when necessary.  

    What behavior plan do you use? 

    Every teacher has a behavior plan that he or she uses in the classroom. This plan may include standards for behavior as well as consequences for undesired behaviors and rewards for meeting expectations. In some cases, the structure of the plan may not be appropriate for a child with autism. By discussing the plan and working with the teacher to make tweaks that will work for your child, you can address behavioral concerns before they become a problem.  

    What is the best way to communicate with you? 

    Just because you see your child’s teacher in the carpool line, it doesn’t that that is the best time to chat. Ask your child’s teacher if phone calls, emails, or conferences work best, and stick to those preferences. Doing so will help you have productive communication.  

    The Behavior Exchange is here to be your child’s advocate in the classroom and throughout his or her educational career. Contact us today at (888) 716-8084 for more information ABA therapy in Plano and our school services.